martin.to »

meta

(about this site)

I have been sporadically creating personal and non-personal websites since 2006, when I asked my sire if we could go and learn some HTML at KVHS Harz. The other participants regularly thought that my father must have forced his poor six-year-old to attend this course. Ha.

Even though the course was quite outdated and bad (even for 2006 standards — think <FONT> and <FRAMESET>, ugh!), it resonated with me and I began creating home pages on my own.

this site

Since 2018, I have — once again — a personal home page, which uses the martin.to domain name; that is really cool. I might print it on a shirt some day.

motivation

I think having your own home page is an invaluable opportunity to collect thoughts and ideas, while having a (theoretically) unrestricted and independent creative outlet. Think of it as my little contribution to keep the web open, accessible and decentralized.

Here is a more elaborate version of the point that I have just tried to make.

Also, this site is inspired by loooots of my own favourite websites. Now and then, you might stumble upon a design decision on this site that might have originated at:

a technical perspective

I still enjoy writing most of the HTML by hand and I am quite efficient at doing so, although I resort to a couple of scripts for generating more complex pages.

I do not use a CMS, because

Being responsible for virtually all of the HTML at this place also means that I can insert an easter egg every now and then. Feel free to write me an e-mail if you find one of these.

editing

I create most pages in GNU Emacs, using web-mode.el amongst other packages for editing HTML and Template::Toolkit markup. Look here for my config.

scripting

Pages such as the whole photos section or the pulp feed are generated using lots of Perl scripts.

Excellent modules of choice include:

tooling

I use a simple Makefile to handle various tasks such as building feeds (perl), rendering photo galleries (perl + GraphicsMagick), rendering stylesheets (perl + sassc) or uploading the whole site (rsync).

hosting

Netcup is hosting this site, and they have been good to me so far. Other people might beg to differ.

There is nothing special about the web stack; since 2019–09–22, it consists of nginx and FreeBSD.